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 Post subject: Warrenpoint 1772
PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:10 pm 
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Location: Warrenpoint
Possibly the oldest sketch of Warrenpoint I know of

Quote:
A view of Carlingford Harbour and Warrin Point from the Domain of Roger Hall, Esq. near Narrow Water To whom this plate is inscribed ...
by Mason, James, 1710-ca.1780 engraver.


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 Post subject: Re: Warrenpoint 1772
PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2015 6:38 am 
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Location: Warrenpoint
That is an old one,not too many buildings about!.Do you have any ideas on what the buildings in the sketch might be ;--)


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 Post subject: Re: Warrenpoint 1772
PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:58 am 
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as it's a sketch and a certain amount of artistic licence will have been used I can only guess - I assume the small building bottom right could be an old mill or part of a forge that was known to be roughly around were the the Dow Mac was) the bigger of the two buildings seen in the town again maybe the old petty sessions building (now part of what was Bradley's garage) and then maybe Hourican's old house beside the marine (purely as it was supposed to be the oldest house in the town) or maybe the house of the infamous Mr Waring? (Of Warings Point) ~x(


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 Post subject: Re: Warrenpoint 1772
PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:42 pm 
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Brian wrote:
as it's a sketch and a certain amount of artistic licence will have been used I can only guess
- I assume the small building bottom right could be an old mill or part of a forge that was known to be roughly
around were the the Dow Mac was) the bigger of the two buildings seen in the town again maybe the old petty
sessions building (now part of what was Bradley's garage) and then maybe Hourican's old house beside the
marine (purely as it was supposed to be the oldest house in the town) or maybe the house of the infamous Mr
Waring? (Of Warings Point) ~x(


This is a bit of a tangled web :D

On the sketch, the General Directory of Newry, Armagh, etc. for 1819 (see http://www.libraryireland.com/Antiquities/Newry.pdf
contains on Pages 29-30 the text:

Warrenpoint is, comparatively speaking, a new village. About sixty years ago. it had only one house, which
stood near the sea shore, at a distance from the road, and which belonged to Mr. Christopher Aiken. At present
it has a very considerable number, and is improving every year. There are many very comfortable lodging houses
in and around the village. The quay is very convenient, and is capable of receiving vessels of large burden. The
windmill, built by Mr. Robert Turner, is a very valuable concern; the machinery, (a large proportion of which is of
cast metal,) having been constructed on the most approved plan.


So, counting back the years "about sixty years ago" is around 1759, less than 15 years before the assumed date
of the sketch (c1772).

On the "infamous Mr Waring" if you go to http://waringestate.com/, click on History on the top
menu and scroll to the bottom of the page you will find first another sketch from c1807 of a view towards
Warrenpoint from Narrow Water, showing (I assume) the Robert Turner windmill noted above, and a forest of
masts from berthed ships. There is also accompanying text:

Samuel’s brother Thomas [Waring] moved to Newry and his line became established as international
merchants importing, along with many diverse and exotic goods, huge quantities of Linseed from Belorussia
and Pennsylvania. The estuary at Newry was so shallow and therefore unable to handle the large ships required
by his trade that he had to establish a pier ten miles to the East. This pier was known as Waring’s Point and a
town grew up around it that took his name. This Waring line later merged again by marriage with Samuel’s line
and returned to Waringstown.


The Thomas Waring (abt 1669-1724) referred to above and his elder brother Samuel (Aug 1660-1739) were sons
of William Waring of Waringstown (1619-1703). Samuel inherited the Waringstown estate on the death of his father.

So unless Thomas established a pier at Warings Point prior to his death in 1724 one of his sons is more likely.

From reading up on the Waring family, however it is clear that William Waring proposed a canal which linked Lough
Neagh to Carlingford Lough in the mid-1600s, a proposal which didn't come to anything in his lifetime, (and in the
1640s General George Monck had made a similar recommendation). William's son Samuel re-proposed it as an MP
together with William Brownlow MP in around 1703.

Then if you go to https://www.britishports.org.uk/our-members/warrenpoint-harbour-authority you will
find the text:

The original Port of Warrenpoint, consisting of a wet dock and piers, was constructed in the late 1770′s by Roger
Hall, Robert Ross and Isaac Corry with the assistance of £500 of public funds. In 1919 the heirs of Roger Hall sold
the Port to John Kelly and Sons for the sum of £16,000. John Kelly continued to operate the Port until 1971 when
it was sold to Warrenpoint Harbour Authority for £369,000.


The majority of the records of the Irish Parliament were destroyed in 1922, however they were also reported
piecemeal in the newspapers of the time, from which come:

1741 - Towards erecting a wet dock and pier at Warren's point in the bay of Carlingford £800
1767 - For erecting a wet dock and pier at warren Point in the bay of Carlingford £1500 (unclear from transcription
whether this reads "L500" - meaning £500 - or £1500)
16 Mar 1771 - £800 towards erecting a wet dock and pier at Warren's Point in the bay of Carlingford - See BNL
19 Mar 1771 Page 2
1771 - the sum of eight hundred to Roger Hall Robert Ross Robert Scott and Edward Correy esquires towards
erecting a wet dock and piers at Warren Point in the Bay of Carlingford to be by them accounted for to Parliament
1779 Roger Hall Robert Ross and Isaac Corry Esqrs towards completing the Wet Dock and Piers at Warren's Point
in the Bay of Carlingford to be accounted for to Parliament granted the said Session £5oo
1782 Roger Hall Robert Ross and Isaac Corry Esqrs - towards completing the Wet Dock and Piers at Warren's Point
in the Bay of Carlingford to be accounted for to Parliament granted the said Session £5oo


Note that no names are attributed to the first monetary awards from the Parliament in 1741 and 1767; note also that the
1771 award could be a deferred (and increased) 1767 award.

Roger Hall (1689-?) was father to Savage Hall (1763-1801), Savage is credited with laying out the plan for the town (as
opposed to the port) of Warrenpoint.

Robert Ross (1702-1769) was MP for Carlingford 1723-1768

Robert Scott (1718-1773) was a Newry merchant and MP for Newry 1768-1773

Edward Corry (1723-1792) was a Newry merchant and MP for Newry 1774-1776

Isaac Corry (1752-1813) was Edward's [in]famous son, and MP for Newry 1776-1800


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