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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 6:31 pm 
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From the Belfast News-Letter, Monday, July 3, 1899

"On Saturday last at the invitation of the Great Northern Railway Company, and also of the Pleasure Steamers of Ireland, Limited, a representative of this newspaper joined a party who had assembled on the occasion of the first trip of the new pleasure steamer Pilot on Carlingford Lough. The district, as is well known, is one that abounds with attractions which cannot fail to be interesting to tourists and all lovers of nature.

For a long time past it has been felt that something more should be done for the development of the Lough, which is so noted for its attractive scenery.
The steamer Pilot has been built on the Clyde to meet that want, and it must be said that she fully meets the hopes that were entertained of her, not only as regards appearance but also as regards accommodation and speed. The vessel was built by Messrs. Richie, Graham and Milne, of Whiteinch, and was engined by Messrs, Campbell and Colderwood, of Paisley. The trial trips on the measured mile were run at Skelmorlie, Wemyss Bay, when her speed of 9.8, or 11.25 English Miles was recorded. The trials took place in calm weather, so that no allowance had to be made, and therefore the record of speed is accurate as a test. This is two miles per hour faster than was originally contemplated, and is very satisfactory to the owners and builders, as it proves conclusively the utility of the double propellers with which the vessel is provided.

The accommodation is very ample for the trade expected in Carlingford Lough. The steamer has a Board of Trade certificate for 552 persons, and is at liberty to ply with this number as far as Haulbowline lighthouse - about ten miles distant – so that visitors may now enjoy the beauties of Carlingford Lough without any restriction, and make trips sufficiently far seaward to embrace a view of the Mourne Mountains to their full extent. The saloon, which is forward, is forty-three feet in length, comfortably seated all round, and there is a small pantry at the after end, with arrangements for providing tea and coffee and other light refreshments on a liberal scale.

It is a well-known fact that the chief difficuly in navigating Carlingford Lough arises from the shallow water which surrounds the shore. Although the pilot is 18 Foot 6 Inches broad, her draft is only 2 Foot eight Inches forward and 3 Foot 11 Inches aft, so that she can approach or leave the Northern pier at Warrenpoint at all times of the tide. She can also discharge or load passengers at the new jetty at Rostrevor. The nautical authorities who have seen the vessel are, it is stated, unaminous in the opinion that, with ordinary screws on the restricted draft, it would be impossible to attain, with a single engine, the speed which is attained by the Pilot. The two propellers run on the same axis, but in different directions, one turning to the right and the other to the left. There are only two blades to each propeller, and each blade is 5 Square Feet in superficial area. Only two blades are in the water at the same time, the line of shaft being several Inches above water level. In action two of the blades strike the water at the same time – one on the right-hand side and the other on the left – and meet when they come opposite the keel at the bottom. It has been remarked that the ship is singularly free of vibration.

The screws are 8 Foot 6 Inches in diameter, and 11 Foot 5 Inches pitch. A very interesting feature connected with these propellers is that there is no perceptible depression of the stern when the vessel is running at full speed. In efforts to attain considerable speed with the ordinary screw on very shallow draft the steamer invariably sits down, as it is termed, in some cases as much as a Foot, so that this Foot has to be added in estimating the draft. If a similar depression took place with the Pilot the water to carry her full speed would have to be at least five Feet deep instead of four, as at present. It has been said that screws operating partly out of water cannot show full efficiency if they work beyond six miles per hour, owing to the supposed circumstances that air would be drawn down, but in the case of the Pilot the efficiency is maintained, and appears even greater at the high speed, so that the loss of power through sucking down the air appears to be absolutely non-existent. The engines make, when at full speed, about 170 revolutions per minute, but those of the screws are considerably less, the proportion being 24 to 40, engines are compound surface condensing, high pressure cylinder 11 Inches in diameter, and carrying steam at a pressure of 120lbs. Three-fourths of the deck is covered by an awning, which can very readily be extended or rolled up, and will be found useful in case of wet weather or excessive sunshine.

The vessel and machinery have been constructed under the advice and supervision of Mr. H. Roscoe, naval architect, Drury Chambers, Liverpool, and the propellers have been patented by Mr. Henry Barcroft, D.L., The Glen, Newry, the Chairman of the Pleasure Steamers of Ireland, Limited. The Pilot will run in connection with the Great Northern Railway, and it is pleasing to know that negotiations are in progress with the Isle of Man Steampacket Company which, it is hoped, will result in a steamer from that company coming to the vicinity once a week or once a fortnight during the season. The passengers will be landed by the Pilot and embarked the same way, and always at a fixed hour, regardless of tide.

The visit of pleasure steamers to Carlingford Lough from different places has been impracticable heretofore owing to the fact that a large steamer can only come alongside at Warrenpoint an hour and a half before high water and remain there until and hour and a half after high water; but now, by merely dropping her anchor in the pool, the passengers can be transferred to the Pilot and landed without difficulty at any state of the tide. It is intended to publish weekly timetables of the new vessel’s movements, which the Great Northern Railway Company have arranged to post at all their stations and in the principal towns served by the Company, so that pleasure parties can always engage the services of the steamer if it is done ahead of the published advertisements. It is satisfactory to note the cordial way in which the enterprise of the Pleasure Steamers of Ireland, Limited, has been met by the Great Northen Railway Company. It is quite evident that the railway company are determined to do all that they can to bring tourists to the Carlingford Lough district, and it is hoped that their wise action may be imitated by other companies interested in the Irish traffic. Before the party boarded the steamer at Warrenpoint on Saturday last an excellent luncheon was served at the Great Northen Hotel, of which Mr. Booth is the capable manager.

The vessel proceeded as far as Greenore, stopping at Carlingford on the way, but as the weather was showery the scenery of the district was not seen to best advantage. In other respects, however the trip was satisfactory. Those on board included Mr. Henry Barcroft, D.L., Chairman of the Pleasure Steamers of Ireland, Limited; R.J. Moore, Superintendent of the Great Northern Railway Company; H. A. Matier (Norton & Co. car service, Kilkeel), J. Edgar Connor, Thomas Smith (Warrenpoint), Samuel marowan, S.E. Martin, M.A., M.D. and Alexander Wheelan. The sentiments duly honoured on board were “Prosperity to the Pleasure Steamers of Ireland, Limited”, coupled with the name of Mr. Henry Barcroft, D.L.; “The Great Northen Railway Company”, coupled with the name of Mr. R.J. Moore; and “The Press”. Mr. James O’Hagan, it should be mentioned, has been appointed Master of the steamer."

Regards
Jim


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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 7:02 pm 
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Interesting article Jim. I wonder what became of the 'Pilot'.


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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 10:25 am 
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Hi PatMG07

Can’t find any trace of Pilot subsequently - there was another one too – the Pioneer:

From the Belfast News-Letter, Ireland), Monday, September 7, 1896:

[This is a description of the visit of a party from the Institute of Journalists to Warrenpoint and Rostrevor]

“From Warrenpoint the party had the option of making the run to Rostrevor by steamer or tramcar, the privileges in connection with which were kindly granted by the Warrenpoint Pleasure Steamer Company and Rostrevor Tramway Company respectively. Quite a large party availed themselves of the opportunity of the sail up Carlingford Lough, and the remainder patronised the tramcars, from which an excellent view of mountain and Lough is obtainable along the pretty road that leads to Rostrevor.....The sail by the Pioneer was pleasantly accomplished, the English visitors expressing unbounded admiration of the glorious scenery that meets the eye at every point in the district, so richly endorsed by nature.....Those interested in mechanical engineering had their tastes gratified by the description in a little brochure – a copy of which was presented by the Warrenpoint Pleasure Steamer Company to each person on board – of the machinery on board the Pioneer, which is a novelty in the utilisation of gas for driving power, which seems capable of very wide application. Mr. Henry Barcroft represented the Company on board, and was most attentive to the party, offering much valuable information on objects of interest in the locality.

The steamer on nearing the landing place at Rostrevor “stood by” while a photograph was taken of her and the company aboard by a representative of Mr. Lawrence, Dublin. A similar operation took place after landing, when the same gentleman photographed the party in a group in the pretty gardens belonging to the Mourne Hotel”

Henry Barcroft’s family lived at The Glen, Newry. He came from a Quaker family who were granted lands in Ireland in Cromwellian times, and he married Anna Richardson Malcolmson (whose Uncle John Grubb Richardson founded Bessbrook) in 1867.

Henry was made a Director at the Bessbrook Spinning Company. He had a flair for practical invention and made a change to the power looms in the mills so they could carry three or four threads concurrently instead of one – this made possible a far wider cloth, increasing machine productivity and reducing costs. He patented the “Bessbrook” self-twilling Jacquard machine in 1869. In 1881 he published a booklet entitled “Steam tramways: a Pressing Want of the Times” (see http://www.archive.org/details/steamtramwaysap00barcgoog ), an indication of his interest in tram transport.

He was also involved in the Newry-Bessbrook Electric tramway, which was opened in 1885, and introduced the capability for the carriage wheels to run on both the rails and the roadway, and for the trams to automatically close the level crossing gates (before they got to them!) and open them again after passing. He also established the Newry Free Library in 1897.

He also introduced and patented the propellers referred to above to address concerns over erosion of the Newry Canal banks from propeller wash. The wash from the propellers he developed is forced under the water surface by the propellers and so is almost totally dissipated. The propellers were installed on lighters which regularly plied the canal between Newry and Portadown in the 1890s. He was made Deputy Lieutenant of County Down, and later High Sherrif of County Armagh.

Henry died in 1905, is buried at the Friends Burial Ground, Grange, Co. Tyrone, and his headstone inscription reads:
“HENRY BARCROFT OF THE GLEN, NEWRY, SON OF JOSEPH & MARY BARCROFT OF STRANGMORE LODGE, BORN 6TH OF SIXTH MONTH, 1839, DIED 18TH OF ELEVENTH MONTH, 1905”

The Northern Ireland Place Name database ( see http://www.ulsterplacenames.org/PDF%20Files/Newry%20and%20Mourne%20(C.%20Dunbar).pdf ) states that Barcroft Park, Newry is named after Sir Joseph Barcroft (ie “Barcroft is a English surname, named after Sir Joseph Barcroft (1872-1947) a scientist born in Glen, Newry”, however it is arguable that his father Henry did far more for the development of Newry and the surrounding area.

Regards
Jim


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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 10:26 am 
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Well there are still a few 'Pioneers' about the point these days.....but not too many ! :rotfl:


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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 10:34 am 
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PatMG07

:rotfl:

Jim


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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 10:57 am 
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ah, interesting little quote in there....

Quote:
The steamer on nearing the landing place at Rostrevor “stood by” while a photograph was taken of her and the company aboard by a representative of Mr. Lawrence, Dublin. A similar operation took place after landing, when the same gentleman photographed the party in a group in the pretty gardens belonging to the Mourne Hotel


That means there will be photographs as the "representative of Mr. Lawrence, Dublin" I'm almost 100% certain would be a photographer from the Lawrence collection, and therefore is very possibly linked to this

http://www.oldwarrenpointforum.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=4854


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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 11:14 am 
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Very interesting article Jim............I remember the Barcroft`s house at the bottom of the Dublin Road ,even though Barcroft Park was named after the family the house was situated where the Glen houses are today, they were built by P.Carvill & Sons of Warrenpoint in the fifties...............I think the original pillars of the gateway still stand at the entrance to this estate ................................................................
A photo of the Pioneer should be available from the Lawrence Collection, I think the original collection is in the National Library in Dublin ................................


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PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2009 8:35 am 
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patMG07 wrote:
Interesting article Jim. I wonder what became of the 'Pilot'.


PatMG07

Found her! She ended up in Portugal (see http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=14081)

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Jim


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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 12:37 pm 
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northbrook wrote:
.....A photo of the Pioneer should be available from the Lawrence Collection, I think the original collection is in the National Library in Dublin.


Northbrook

Joanne has found it and posted it - see viewtopic.php?f=23&t=11388 (third photo).

Jim


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