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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:03 pm 
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FORTH AVENUE 1953-1970

"Fond memory brings the light of other days around me."

(Thomas Moore 1779-1852)

" What we keep in our memory is ours, unchanged forever."
(Anonymous)

In the early 1950's the parents of the 'Baby Boom' generation of Warrenpoint needed housing, and in in November 1951 the Ministry for Health and Local Government gave the nod for a site on top of Forth Road to be purchased, the site cost £800, ludicrously cheap by today's standards.
At a council meeting held at Warrenpoint Town Hall on June the 5th 1952, the McMahon Brothers of Burren were awarded the building contract for the 34 houses to be named Forth Avenue. Mr. Edward Caulfield was the Chairman, and Mr. D.A. West was the Vice-Chairman. The complete estate cost the princely sum of £53,615.
We, my mother, father, Vera and myself, moved into number 26 just before Christmas 1953. These houses had inside toilets, complete with a bath, although some people my age avoided the bath as if it was the plague.
In global terms the world was in a state of flux, Josef Stalin had died in March of that year, the war in Korea was stuttering to an uneasy truce and the Cold War was raging, food rationing had just ended, smuggling goods from Omeath was constant. Historians have referred to this time, as the age of anxiety, The Atomic Age, but up on Forth Avenue we may well have been living on some far flung distant galaxy, as we were insulated from all the woes of the world.
My father, was a bricklayer, and worked on the construction of the houses. I can rememember my mother taking my sister and for a walk along the Donaghguy Road, and she impatiently willed the workers to go faster so we could move in.
We were living in Duke Street with my father's Aunt Ginny, but my mother could not wait to get her own house “up in the country”, as Forth Avenue was regarded in those days. The majority of young married couples who moved into Forth Avenue were living with in-laws or in Dickensian housing somewhere in the town. First time house buyers or mortgages for working class people were unheard of in those days. It was a big worry if you were not allocated a house, as you had to keep ‘sweet’ with the local councillors. In those days housing allocation was a contentious issue, as it was every where else in Northern Ireland. Jim McCart, ex-Chairman of the Newry and Mourne District Council said of the thorny issue of council accomodation, 'I will perish on the rock of housing.' History tells us Mr. McCart survived 'the rock of housing,' only just. Yes housing was a controversial subject, and history may repeat itself, if we are not careful.
Between Dromore Terrace and Forth Avenue there was only a few private houses, there was no Mourne Drive or Ardallan Park. Iveagh Avenue was built a couple of years after Forth Avenue but the street lighting still went off at around midnight.
So Forth Avenue was seen as a satellite estate out in the 'sticks'. When the housewives of the Avenue went to the town to get their shopping, they tried to ensure they didn’t forget any items as it appeared a long way back to the town, and of course Forth Avenue was situated right on top of a hill, it was no easy task pushing a pram full of wailing children up to the top.
Down at the little Unitarian graveyard and just across the road from Geordie Walker's house, (Jim Kenny's) there was reputed to be a ghost or a 'mystery man', lurking in the bushes or behind the wall. One would always feel a chill on the back of ones necks going past that area after dark. Mostly we moved up and down the road in a bunch, safety in numbers being the appropriate mode of travel. Some times Jack White, a lovely man, of the eponymous corner would walk us up past the graveyard and safety, and this was in daylight.
The first girl born in Forth Avenue was Mary Slevin, the first boy born in Forth Avenue was my brother Harry, and both these events took place in 1954.
One event sticks out in my mind, maybe about 1957, Magee's at No. 24 had a little pup, just a few days old, and it was choking on a bone, we were only young and stood watching helplessly as the poor little creature struggled for its life. Eventually four men came on the scene, Harry Smith, Paddy Ruddy, Bill McCartney, and Hughie Carr, and they struggled valiantly to help with that little pup as if it was their own child, but the pup finally died, those four men were totally despondent over the pup's demise. I have never forgotten that incident, those men having completed a day's work and probably wanted to sit down and unwind, but they had only one thought, to save that little dog's life.
There was a huge reservoir of goodness up in that place. Nowadays you could be lying dead in your house and people would not miss you. Life was not perfect by any means, there were economic hardships, people had great difficulties rearing large families, but they all managed to eventually rear their families. Expatriate Forth Avenue residents are spread all over the globe.
In the early 1960's, there was a family of red headed boys from Glasgow, called the Hatties, nephews of Geordie Dinsmore, in No. 8, who came on holiday to Warrenpoint. There was another young Scottish lad from Ayr who was a nephew of Harry Smith Sen., at No.6, who also holidayed here.
All these Scottish boys were soccer-mad, so there was a challenge handed to them to play a football match up in the square at the top of the Avenue. This was our field of dreams; it could have been Croke Park or Old Trafford. Our team would have been, Paul Dinsmore, Brendan Heatley, Micheal ('Sprick,') O'Hare, Pat O'Hare, (R.I.P.) Karl Sherry, John Boyle and myself. But the challenge was accepted, and the game commenced. However this highly charged clash of the young Titans was cut short when the young Scottish lad from Ayr volleyed the ball through Hughie Wray's large front window.
Mayhem ensued, people were running everywhere to escape, it cost a few pounds to replace the window pane. The parents of all involved chipped in to make good the damage, and my parents never let me forget that for a long time after the incident,
money was very tight in those days. The boy who vollyed the ball through the window - his name was Desmond Brown he went on to become a barrister, and eventually an Labour M.P. for Kilmarnock. In 1997 he also became one of Tony Blair's New Labour Ministers in Northern Ireland along with Dr. John Reid. He has now moved on to become Minister for Defence, and at this moment in time trying to get the debacle in Iraq sorted out, I hope his sense of direction and aiming has improved.

The Original Residents (to the best of my knowledge.)

No. 2 on the Forth Road was Bob, ('Dodds') Mena Waters and family. Bob worked for the Warrenpoint Urban Council, and he is still going the rounds as they say. He now lives in Orchard Villas, Mrs. Watters passed away a few years ago.
No. 4 on the Forth Road was Jim and Teresa Quinn and family. Jim a native of Newry, and a fine carpenter is still going strong. Mrs. Quinn died in 1977.
No. 6 on the Forth Road were the Wilson sisters, Lily, Ruth and Madge, very quiet people and good neighbours. The sisters never married and have all died, but they still have nieces, nephews and cousins in the area.
No. 8 on the Forth Road were Billy and Emma McCoy and family, Billy worked on the Quay, firstly as coalman and then as a docker. Billy McCoy served the community as a Unionist councillor for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. McCoy have both passed away.

The Avenue

No 1 Forth Avenue (going into the Avenue) was Mrs. Maggie Cunningham, a widower. She had two sons John and Billy. I remember Billy coming home on leave from the Royal Navy, I believe Billy's wife was from Malta. Mrs Cunningham passed away in 1963/65 I can remember being taken in to see her at her wake; she was one of the first corpses I saw. Her grandson is the Principal of Kilkeel High School, she has other grandsons in the locality.
No 2 Tommy, Lottie Rice and family. Tommy came originally from Clontifleece and Mrs. Rice came from the Antrim Road in Belfast. Their daughter Mary was my sister Geraldine's godmother in 1958, sadly Mary passed away in 1994 at a young age. Mrs. Rice died a few years ago. Tommy Rice died in late November 2006.
No. 3 Jim, Emma Wilson and family. Originally from Annalong, Mr. Wilson was a serving officer with the R.U.C. Mr. Wilson was transferred to Larne in 1960 (approx.) Mrs. Wilson kept in touch with my mother for a number of years, and their oldest son Sammy visited the town to renew old acquaintances a few years ago. I can only suppose Mrs. Wilson has passed away, her husband died in the early 60's.
No. 4 Billy, Anne McCormack and family. Billy was a Rostrevor man, and his father was a blacksmith, the stone forging ring that proudly sits in Rostrevor Square was owned by the McCormack family. He is also the uncle of Micheal Carr, Chairman of the Newry and Mourne District Council. Mrs. McCormack was a Dinsmore from Springfield Road. Mr. and Mrs. McCormack now live in Mourne Drive. Their son Liam runs a pub in New York city, he made the journey from Fourth Avenue to Fifth Avenue. My sister Vera and brother Frankie dropped in on him recently, and were well received.
No. 5 Agnes and Teresa Toner resided here. They lived originally in the Thomas Street area but may have come from the Mayobridge years ago. Agnes was a housekeeper for the McAnulty family in Church Street. Teresa did not enjoy the best of health and was confined to bed, and she was bedeviled with a consumptive cackle. When one 'ran a message' for her you were rewarded with a Farley's Rusk which you had to eat in her presence. I can testify that it was quite difficult, as they were as dry as the Sahara Desert.
No. 6 Harry and Julia Smith and family, Harry was an exceptional welder and a gentleman to boot. I can remember Harry Smith and my father taking out our old range, and installing a tiled surround in our front room, no mean feat. Julia was a McGuigan and is still going strong with a memory that is sharp as a tack. Michael Smith their son died in London in 1975 aged just 19 years of age, he will never grow old. Harry (sen.) died in 1977. Bernadette the youngest girl still lives in No. 6.
No. 7 Jack Sloane and family who came from Belfast. Mr. Sloane worked in the Dow-Mac in a clerical capacity. Their children were Helen and Jackie, after a few years they moved to Linton Lodge on the Rostrevor Road and then returned to Belfast. They owned a black car, a Sunbeam Talbot, I think. One very wet morning he packed a load of children in and took us to school, about 1955 or 1956. This was probably my first journey in a car. I have no idea of the current whereabouts of the Sloane family. John and Nessa Holmes (McCoy) moved in next, their family are scattered all over the globe. John passed away a few years ago, but Nessa is living now on the brow of the hill.
No.8 Geordie, Paddy and Pat (Wray) Dinsmore came from Charlotte Street. Geordie had a scooter, and was a keen golfer. He was the owner of the 'St. Patrick' a Red Star boat that ran from Omeath to Warrenpoint in the summer months. Now sadly the Red Star boats are gone. Paddy Dinsmore was a star of local pantomimes and Variety Shows, possessor of a fine singing voice, in 1960 he joined the crew of 'The Canberra,' a famous liner that was constructed in Belfast, and made a career for himself singing at shows performed on voyages at sea. He now lives in Stratford-on-Avon, running a restaurant. Pat, their sister, married Hughie Wray and eventually went to live across the road. Geordie died in 1979. Paddy was home a few years ago and he definitely has discovered the Elixir of Youth.

The Square

No. 9 Len and Ruby O'Hagan lived here for a couple of years. Len O'Hagan went on to make a name for himself in the cardboard-carton industry and was awarded the C.B.E. for his services to that industry. I remember Len O'Hagan cycling on a girl's bike which had a basket attached to the handlebars. Benny and Anne Leddy and their family moved in and lived in the house for a number of years. Benny was a painter and came from Burren, while his wife was a Dubliner. The Leddy,s moved to Summerhill in the late 1960's. Mr. Leddy was a cousin of Mrs. Julia Smith. Sadly Benny Leddy died in July 2006.
No. 10 John and Sarah 'Bubbles' Mullan (nee Heaton) lived here for a short while but then returned to the Clermont Gardens area. Pat, Margaret Hughes and family lived here in my time. Pat was an ex-Desert Rat and saw a lot of action in the Second World War. Mrs. Hughes was a Caulfield, an old Warrenpoint family who were in the Jaunting Car business. Pat Hughes had a car, a Ford Prefect or Popular, I think. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes have both passed away. They had two children, Peter lives in the South of Ireland, and Patricia still lives in Warrenpoint.
No. 11 Peter and May Moore lived here, but only for a short while and they moved back to the Newry St. area. Peter's claim to fame was that he was the first dame in the inaugural Warrenpoint pantomime in 1951.
Then Liam and Madge Stewart and family lived in this house. Mr. Stewart was from Thomas St. and Mrs. Stewart was a Newry girl. Liam and Madge Stewart now live in Ardallan Park. Liam Stewart's father was a G.A.A. official with Warrenpoint G.F.C. and the Down County Board for many years, he was also the campanologist at St. Peter's Church.
No. 12 Desmond and Mary Slevin and family lived here. Both Mr. and Mrs. Slevin came from Armagh, in fact Dessie Slevin played for the Armagh G.A.A. in the 1950 Ulster Final, and they produced a son, Martin, who played for Down. Martin emulated his father by appearing in an Ulster Final. Mr. and Mrs. Slevin now live in Rossmara Park.
No. 13 Dessie and Annie McCabe and family. Dessie was a Duke Street man and his wife was a sister of Liam Stewart two doors down.
No. 14 James and Jinny McMahon and family. James was a Burren man and worked for many years on the Quay, his wife was a native of Carlingford. They also gave the showbiz world 'Big O' (the rest of the world is still recovering from that event.) Mr. and Mrs. McMahon have both passed away in the last few years.
John and Lou Luckie moved in after the McMahon's left for Charlotte St. He was from Newtownhamilton, and an avid Armagh G.A.A. supporter. Mrs. Luckie was from Newry. It is sad to say John Luckie never lived to see his beloved Armagh receive the Sam Maguire Cup in 2002.
No. 15 Seamus, Joan Larmour and family. Seamus was Mary Street man and his wife was from Newry. Their only daughter Ailish died in 1994, Joseph and Donal still live here. Seamus, a joiner by trade, was the last of the original tenants of Forth Avenue; he passed away in April 2006. Mrs. Larmour died a number of years ago. Seamus Larmour died in April 2006.
No. 16 Hughie, Lena and Charmaine Carr. Lena was always trying to broaden our outlook, and she encouraged me to take up stamp collecting. I was not very good at philately, in fact I was a miserable failure despite Lena's great efforts. Hughie died a number of years ago, and Lena is living in Moygannon Court.
No. 17 Gerry, Gertie Boyle and family. I can remember Gerry's parents living up at the very top of the Bridle Loanan, in fact we use to go up there and get goat's milk. Mrs. Boyle was a Scottish girl and came here on her holidays in the late 1940's, and the rest as they say is history. The Boyle's had a car, a fawn Hillman Minx SZ 1875. Gerry Boyle died in 1978 and Mrs. Boyle died in 2003.Their son John played football for Glenavon F.C., Sligo Rovers F.C. and Newry Town F.C. in the 1970's. He was a Northern Ireland Youth International, and undoubtably was one of the finest footballers of his generation, or any other generation for that matter.
No 18 Mr. and Mrs. Bill McCartney and family lived here. Bill McCartney was a teacher at Newry Grammer School, and was reputed to have played football for Cliftonville F.C. and represented the Northern Ireland Amateur Soccer team as a goalkeeper. This gave him instant hero status amongst the football mad kids of the Avenue. Mrs. McCartney was English, and a very friendly woman, she had a very polite way of speaking. The oldest boy was called John, but we called him 'Mac'. I can remember one freezing Christmas morning, about 1958, Mr. McCartney organized a game of football in the 'rush field' which belonged to the late Dick Nugent.
They left Warrenpoint in the early 1960's, I have no idea where the McCartney family are today, but I would dearly love to know.
No 19 Matt, Mary Cole and family. Matt was a Rostrevor man and Mary was a McAteer from the Thomas Street area, they returned to Thomas Street after about 3 or 4 years on the hill. They have a daughter Anne, a solicitor, who is now married to a vet and is living on the Isle of Mull.
Hughie and Pat Wray (nee Dinsmore) then moved in to rear their family here. Both Mr. and Mrs. Wray both passed away a few years ago.
No 20 Terry, Rose McComiskey and family. Terry was a great joiner and a gifted pianist, whose family lived in East Street. His father Billy sold sticks around the town from the back of a cart pulled by a little donkey. Terry's wife Rose was from Newry and was the Aunt of the recent chairman of the Newry and Mourne Council, Jack Patterson.. She died quite young.
Raymond and Pat Leddy moved into this house probably in the late 1950's, they owned a lovely yellow Ford Anglia. They have moved now to Rossmara Park.

No.s 21 to 28

No. 21 Billy (Bingo), Josephine White and family, Billy had a famous Uncle called 'Turk' White who kept little dinghies at the baths. If you kept in with young 'Bingo' you could get a free sail. Mrs. White was from County Meath, and they met and married in London after the Second World War. Mr. and Mrs. White both died in the mid-90's. An apochcrypal story from the early 60's was that the TV personality and singer Cilla Black was a relation of the White family. Her real name was Priscilla White, and her grandfather was reputed to hail from Warrenpoint.
No. 22 Paddy, Margaret Ruddy. 'Buttons' Ruddy was perpetual motion, he would get up early in the morning to clean chimneys, and then go on to do his full time job with the firm of Arnie Wilson, the builder. The Ruddy's had the first television in the Avenue, I can well remember their front room being full of children watching children’s hour on the 'box', it was like a mini cinema, no one was ever turned away. Mrs. Ruddy was from Newtownhamilton, she is alive and well living in Clermont Gardens. Paddy Ruddy died in 1989.
No. 23 John, Shebail O'Hare and family lived here until 1963. Mr. O'Hare was a pastry chef, who opened the 'Cake Shop' in the Square with money he won from playing Bingo (not Bingo White.), and now their sons Jim and Micheal run it now. John O'Hare won numerous medals playing for St. Peter's G.A.A. team, and played for Down in the 1941 Ulster Final, Down's first ever appearance in the final. Mr. O'Hare was also my brother Harry's godfather in April 1954. Mrs. O'Hare was from Newry, and from an early age I was fascinated by her christian name, I have never heard anyone else with that beautiful name.
No 24 John ('Laughton'), Maureen Magee and family, John was from Mary Street and his father John Sen. was a skilful boatman, he was a pilot who navigated many vessels into Warrenpoint harbour in all kinds of treacherous weather. No radars in those days. Dr. Donal O'Tierney, (jun.) no mean sailor himself, told me how John 'Skin' Magee taught him to sail when he was in his teens. Mrs. Magee was from Newry, another one of the Newry contingent that abounded in Forth Avenue.
No. 25 John, Maisie McKevitt and family, John was from Charlotte Street, and an accordion player. Listening to him play was a great source of entertainment for us. Mrs. McKevitt hailed from Manorhamilton in Co. Leitrim. They met in Birmingham after the war, and came home to rear their family. Both Mr. and Mrs. McKevitt have passed away.
No. 26 Frank, Jinny Heatley and family. My father was a bricklayer from Duke Street while my mother was from Chapel St. in Newry, up behind the Gasworks. I spent my summer holidays up there when my grandmother and aunts were alive. When I came back to Warrenpoint, after my holidays in Newry, I found it difficult to settle in again after all the freedom I had had. My father would comment it was the effect of the Gasworks.
My father tried to settle in Newry when first wed, but the call of Warrenpoint resonated too loudly, and he scurried back to the seaside. The Newry/Warrenpoint rivalry was a constant source of conflict in our home, we were the products of a mixed marriage, and we had divided loyalties. We all live locally, except for my sister Vera who resides in Belfast, and my brother Harry who has brought eternal shame on the family, he resides in Newry.
No. 27 Molly, Terry and Micheal Galvin. Terry was a film buff and probably imbued in me a love of the cinema; he also had a projector which he showed bits of movies in the alcove under their stairs. One has to remember there was no ready access to TV’s, videos or DVD'S, so to get invited into Galvin's to see a bit of a film was a real treat. I fell out with Terry once, which resulted in me getting barred from seeing his films, I cried and whinged so much that my mother interceded on my behalf to get me rehabilitated with the Galvins. I made sure I never fell out with them again, well not until we got our own television. Micheal was brilliant at putting together model Airfix kits, I see Micheal occasionally as he now lives in Drumsesk Place. Molly died in 1991. Terry has settled in Antrim Town.
No. 28 John, Maureen Dinsmore and family lived here for a few years, but the call of John's home area became too great and they decamped for Clermont Gardens, where they still reside. Bob Reay and his wife lived here for a short while, before they left for the Liverpool.


10 Forth Rd. My Uncle Brian, his wife Rosaleen and brood lived here. They had made the short journey from Forth Cottage just down the back hill. They left in 1968 for Mourne Drive, Brian died in 1999, my Aunt Rowey' is still going about. I have a raft of memories about my Uncle Brian and his family.
No.12 Johnny Campbell and his wife Irene, who came from Belfast as an evacuee, and their family, resided here. Johnny was a larger than life character, who revelled in telling a few tall-tales in his time. A very handy man who could fix most things, he always had a car, and if anyone needed a lift anywhere Johnny made himself available. Mrs. Campbell passed away a few years ago, Johnny is now in his mid-80's and lives in Kilkeel and I see him now and again.
Gerry Hughes and his family may have been allocated this house originally, but they swapped with Johnny Campbell who was then living in Clonallon Gardens.

From the late 1960's people began leaving the Avenue for one reason or another, to be closer to the town, for a larger house in a different area, or as my parents complained the hill was getting steeper and we left for Ardallan Park in 1970. The diaspora is virtually complete today.
I still have friends today that I had over fifty years ago, that to me is quite inspirational, and I am eternally grateful.
It is nice to know where you come from, as I believe it can help to indicate the right direction you will take when you arrive at the many crossroads and difficulties, life puts in front of you.
But if the truth be told, in this absurd, rapidly changing and constantly bewildering universe, spiritually we are all still up there, because to the children who were reared up on that hill it really was our own piece of Arcadia, a place like no where else on earth. Maybe most youngsters would say the same thing, about their own area, but we all believed it.

Hugh Heatley
Oakland Grove
(Campbell’s Pond)
12th March-2006

Bradley, L. Dr. (1998)Warrenpoint Origins an Developments. Pub. by Doc. Liam Bradley.
The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (1980) Oxford University Press
The Newry Reporter 1967


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:05 pm 
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Good !!, I`m glad to see that back on.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:17 pm 
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I have been away all day in Bangor, visiting the in-laws, painful enough at the best of times, I did not know about the site crash, I am trying to upload the article again. My young fellow has the house like a tip, the wife is like a weasel and gone to bed, his friends are lying all over the place, I am into my second bottle of wine, the screen has gone all funny or is it me?
I am trying to get the photo onto the site, with great difficulty, oh isn't life a bitch, and then you die!!!
I think I have may have passed out, but anyway ask me that later.

In the photo, in the backgroung looking out the window is Mrs. John 'Laughton' Magee,a great nieghbour, beside her is a wee lad that is me. She was minding me while my mother went down the town, Mrs. Magee made the loveliest tomato and salad cream sandwiches I have ever tasted.
Mrs. Maureen Magee died in 2004.

I have just missed the wine bottle by about 4 foot, and knocked it over.
It was a lively little Bordeaux, right now there is not much life left in me.
I will try again tomorrow.
Night night all.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 12:56 am 
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Perhaps some of you could confirm a story about Forth Road/Avenue that my mother told me years ago.
She said that in the row where she lived 3 of the families grew their own veg in the back garden and one lady did not grow veg but bought hers in the town.
The three ladies who grew their own veg all developed Thyroid problems and the fourth lady did not. My mother recalled that there were a team of scientists who came to take samples of the soil at the time but did not remember ever hearing the outcome of their testings.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 1:12 am 
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Sorted that picture for you Hugh :mrgreen: you had posted a link to another picture on site, not the one from your photobucket album 8)


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 4:53 am 
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Well, thanks to the forum crash, I came across this wonderful bit of writing from Hugh that I must have missed before. I have to say Hugh that you captured the essence and spirit of the Point in those days after the war. Sure there was gloom in those days of scarcity and struggles but there was also an optimism and carefree approach to life. In many ways, I think that we, of that generation, were very fortunate to have grown up in that nurturing place called the Point.

Thank Hugh for a great piece of writing and another insight into that wonderful place of our youth.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 2:13 pm 
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wonderful Dicky yep fourth rd/ave was the place to live ok.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 3:11 pm 
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I remember the tomato and saladcream sandwiches only too well, I was reared on them, even to this day Im partial to the odd one. her brown sauce and sugar sandwiches were equaly as tasty.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:22 am 
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dukestreet wrote:
I have been away all day in Bangor, visiting the in-laws, painful enough at the best of times, I did not know about the site crash, I am trying to upload the article again. My young fellow has the house like a tip, the wife is like a weasel and gone to bed, his friends are lying all over the place, I am into my second bottle of wine, the screen has gone all funny or is it me?
I am trying to get the photo onto the site, with great difficulty, oh isn't life a bitch, and then you die!!!
I think I have may have passed out, but anyway ask me that later.

In the photo, in the backgroung looking out the window is Mrs. John 'Laughton' Magee,a great nieghbour, beside her is a wee lad that is me. She was minding me while my mother went down the town, Mrs. Magee made the loveliest tomato and salad cream sandwiches I have ever tasted.
Mrs. Maureen Magee died in 2004.

I have just missed the wine bottle by about 4 foot, and knocked it over.
It was a lively little Bordeaux, right now there is not much life left in me.
I will try again tomorrow.
Night night all.


Dijon mustard gives a tomato sandwich a bit more bite. Too much if you're not careful.

About the forth rd ave etc

Was there a McCartney kid who suffered from whooping cough and had lot of days off school (D.Rd). I think his first name was Paul. Not to be confused with the Beatle. This lad had red hair. I also remember two Campbell girls named Phyllis and Olive. They had a cousin Violet who lived on the Gas Rd


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:32 am 
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the campbell girls where betty and phylis


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 4:25 pm 
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The campbell family were Girls Betty and Phylis, boys were Tommy and my best mates David and Rodger(dodger) David became the big 50 last july.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:10 pm 
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'local lass' and 'forthroad' have answered most of your question 'nkrumah,' I think you probably mean John 'Mac' McCartney. I do remember him having terrible trouble with whooping cough.
The Campbell girls had a cousin name Violet, whose father was Ernie. They lived up The Burren Road, in the little house that was the original Orange Hall, pre- 1907??
Ernie's wife was Mynah Stoops from the Upper Donaghaguy Road, Ernie passed away in 1975 and the family moved to Kilkeel, as Violet was married to a Kilkeel man, see earlier post re. Mather's Grocery Shop.
When Violet was younger she use to go with Hughie Murphy (The Baby Jesus), and they were engaged to be wed, but Hughie turned up for a date one night, a bit the worse for wear due to drink. This scene took place at the entrance to Forth Avenue about 1966, we were playing football. An altercation ensued and she took off the engagement ring, and flung it at the inebriated Hughie, with the immortal words" Hughie Murphy, I would not marry you if you were the last man on earth." To which the boul' Hughie retorted "well I'll not ask you again.'


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 7:54 pm 
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some people have all the luck.

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irish coleen


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:49 pm 
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Hugh, could you post the names of the children in the photo again?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:50 pm 
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I am very sorry, I did not realise they were not with the photo, please bear with me, as I did not have a good weekend.

Back row: Liam Rice; Billy 'Bingo' White Jun.; Jim O'Hare; Mary (Rice) O'Sullivan RIP.

Front row: Micheal 'Sprick' O'Hare; Anne O'Hare; Mary (Carr) Jenkins.

Looking out through the window in the house behind is Mrs. Maureen Magee RIP.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 10:56 pm 
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Thanks, Hugh!


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 4:44 am 
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dukestreet wrote:
'local lass' and 'forthroad' have answered most of your question 'nkrumah,' I think you probably mean John 'Mac' McCartney. I do remember him having terrible trouble with whooping cough.
The Campbell girls had a cousin name Violet, whose father was Ernie. They lived up The Burren Road, in the little house that was the original Orange Hall, pre- 1907??
Ernie's wife was Mynah Stoops from the Upper Donaghaguy Road, Ernie passed away in 1975 and the family moved to Kilkeel, as Violet was married to a Kilkeel man, see earlier post re. Mather's Grocery Shop.
When Violet was younger she use to go with Hughie Murphy (The Baby Jesus), and they were engaged to be wed, but Hughie turned up for a date one night, a bit the worse for wear due to drink. This scene took place at the entrance to Forth Avenue about 1966, we were playing football. An altercation ensued and she took off the engagement ring, and flung it at the inebriated Hughie, with the immortal words" Hughie Murphy, I would not marry you if you were the last man on earth." To which the boul' Hughie retorted "well I'll not ask you again.'


thanks folks for the correction, phyllis and betty. I think betty was the older. there was a nother girl named Olive (heavily freckled, maybe)

You might have the dates wrong a bit there about Violet, since She'd be around 15 in 1966. Lived at one time in a row of cottages across from Houstons on the Clonallon Rd. Long gone now.

As i remember Violet was "easy on the eye" , but then again at that age I was no connoisseur? primary school. And of course, down the road I learned that looks mean nothing, it is character that matters. :D

No comment at all here about how ladies age , as opposed to men.

This reminds me of Adam Houston, father of three guys, who used to teach CoI Sunday school. Read electricity meters.. Bit fundamentalist.. had a few yarns about Communist China


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 12:28 pm 
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Quote:
This reminds me of Adam Houston
Ah yes, "Mr Houston" also taught me in Sunday School, although taught is maybe not a word I would use..... I am afraid I am not religious and viewed Sunday school as just a way to escape from the church :oops: I did meet some good people there I have to say, so it was not all bad :D My best memory (or worst depending on your viewpoint) was one day asking Mr Houston a simple (to me as a 12 year old anyway) question. "if God made us, who made God?"
quick as a flash he answered "if we knew the answer to that question, we would be God ourselves" ;--) But that was the end of that discussion. I did win a prize at Christmas though, for good attendance if nothing else, mind you as we only lived 5 doors down from the church, I really had no excuse :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 4:00 am 
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"quick as a flash"

Some side effect of reading dodgy electricity meters?

He did in my time have something against Mao and his boys, i've always wondered where he got his info..maybe the Readers Digest?

He didn't really answer your question, did he
? ;--)

(damn smilies)


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2015 9:26 pm 
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Picture missing on this one too Brian.I think Mr Heatley needs to log into his photobucket account :D


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 8:35 am 
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Thanks to Joanne for bringing this
one up again.

Hadn't come across it before.

Dukestreet.....a really enjoyable read.

I remember so many of the people
you speak of.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:45 am 
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Tony,every now and again I pick a section at random from the forum, and go through old posts.A few years ago I had read almost every post,but I have forgotten so many........it's great to jog the memory.You should try it sometime......start with the oldest posts.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 6:34 pm 
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Thanks for that suggestion, Joanne.

I will do just that.! :--)


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 1:36 am 
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Joanne I too am glad you brought
this post up again..
I hadn't read it before either, and it
is very interesting.
Of course a lot of the people I remember
as well.
Dukestreet lovely to read about all those
families you mentioned.
I remember the Campbell-Hughes exchange of
houses.
I thought it was Sonny Campbell and Family
who lived there.


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