Why St Leonard's?

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bornandbred
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Why St Leonard's?

#1 Post by bornandbred » Wed Aug 13, 2008 6:36 pm

If you've ever wondered why St. Leonard's was so-named, here's the answer, from Ros Davies site:

Thomas Carey was a solicitor, and lived in St Leonards-on-Sea in Sussex, England and also at Warrenpoint in a house called St. Leonards in 1881 & 1901.
This photo was kindly sent to me by his descendent John T. Fountain Sr. Contact him if you have a connection
jtfsr@cmaaccess.com

Image
This fragment of photo is Thomas Carey

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#2 Post by northbrook » Thu Aug 14, 2008 9:14 am

Very interesting B&B, a nice wee snippet of local history...........................................

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#3 Post by patMG07 » Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:10 pm

A little bit of information that might have escaped our attention had it not been for B&B and this site ! Thanks for sharing.

I wonder if there are any houses in other parts of the world where ex-pats have lived that are called 'The Point' or even 'Warrenpoint' ?

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#4 Post by Eugene » Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:16 pm

patMG07 wrote:
I wonder if there are any houses in other parts of the world where ex-pats have lived that are called 'The Point' or even 'Warrenpoint' ?
Mines called "whats the point" :rotfl:

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#5 Post by patMG07 » Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:18 pm

Eugene wrote:
patMG07 wrote:
I wonder if there are any houses in other parts of the world where ex-pats have lived that are called 'The Point' or even 'Warrenpoint' ?
Mines called "whats the point" :rotfl:
...and if it is ever demolished it will be called 'Pointless' ! :))

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#6 Post by Eugene » Thu Aug 14, 2008 12:20 pm

And I may have to ........."get to the point"........ :rotfl:

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#7 Post by the gap » Thu Aug 14, 2008 3:25 pm

After we finished moving in to our house the garden at the front was the next thing to be done on the list and as all the Germans have a flag pole in the garden i thought why not and over the next few weeks got every thing finished but the Tri Colour failed so i had to order one.A few days later the flag arrived and out i went to put the flag up and the old guy next door (a German Victor Meldrew) comes out and said you can,t put that flag up it,s not German.So i said to him take a look down the side of the house and asked how long is my garden and how wide is it 70 x 20M maybe says he.Well i said my name is on the deeds so this is now Irish Land :rotfl: He was not amused and did,nt talk to me for a long time. Boy did i get it from the wife :you ejit: THE HOUSE IS NO12 Now you got me thinking Pat a new sign and name for the house Little Ireland :rotfl:

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#8 Post by patMG07 » Thu Aug 14, 2008 4:45 pm

..Gap, seeing as it is number 12 how about Oflag XII (but don't mention that war ) >:)

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#9 Post by the gap » Thu Aug 14, 2008 5:04 pm

patMG07 wrote:..Gap, seeing as it is number 12 how about Oflag XII (but don't mention that war ) >:)
good one Pat :rotfl:

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#10 Post by StLouisGuy » Fri Aug 15, 2008 3:25 am

patMG07 wrote:..Gap, seeing as it is number 12 how about Oflag XII (but don't mention that war ) >:)
:rotfl: :rotfl: You might just start another one. But what the hell, go for it! :rotfl: :rotfl:

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#11 Post by StLouisGuy » Fri Aug 15, 2008 5:33 am

patMG07 wrote:A little bit of information that might have escaped our attention had it not been for B&B and this site ! Thanks for sharing.

I wonder if there are any houses in other parts of the world where ex-pats have lived that are called 'The Point' or even 'Warrenpoint' ?
Here's one.

Warrenpoint
Text was transcribed from a copy of the original National Register nomination document, 1975.

Significance
Warrenpoint was built in 1756, most probably by William Branson. Branson was a leader in colonial iron and steel production, tow local industries which were of great national significance. He was closely associated with the Warwick and Redding iron furnaces, Coventry Forge, and the Vincent Steelworks, which are all located near Warrenpoint in Chester County. (Warwick Township) With Samuel Nutt, another leader of the iron industry in Pennsylvania, he erected Redding Furnace, the second iron furnace to be built in colonial Pennsylvania. Branson was also a pioneer in steel production, and owned the Vincent Steelworks on French Creek, where "blistered steel" was first produced in 1737.

Warrenpoint's significance, however, goes beyond its association with the leadership of the colonial iron and steel industries and its value as a record of the lifestyle supported by those industries. Unchanged by major additions or alterations, it remains a superb example of the early Georgian style as interpreted in the Middle Colonies.

Its plan, in which the center hall is flanked on each side by two generous rooms and a massive chimney, exemplifies the early Georgian ideal of formal balance. Its random fieldstone construction with evenly cut corner quoins is also characteristic of the building tradition of this area, as is the pent eave which crosses each gable end below the attic level. The large windows composed of many small panes are typical of early Georgian architecture, as opposed to later construction in which fewer and larger panes are employed. Finally, the interior detail, largely intact, enhances Warrenpoint's value as an example of the early Georgian. The full-height paneled fireplace walls are very important in this respect.

Warrenpoint, then, is doubly significant, both as a record of the lifestyle associated with the emerging industry in colonial America and as a fine example of the early Georgian farm house, little altered.

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#12 Post by patMG07 » Fri Aug 15, 2008 9:46 am

Found a picture of that house, 'Warrenpoint' (also known as Branson House) .

Image

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#13 Post by bornandbred » Fri Aug 15, 2008 10:01 am

Thanks, SLG - interesting stuff, you're a star! And the other Pat.....lovely picture, is it still in existance & where is it?

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#14 Post by patMG07 » Fri Aug 15, 2008 10:05 am

Warrenpoint in Chester County (Warwick Township)....as above in St. Louis Guy's post (plus do a search in 'Wikipedia' for more info.)

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#15 Post by bornandbred » Fri Aug 15, 2008 7:09 pm

patMG07 wrote:Warrenpoint in Chester County (Warwick Township
I mis-read the post & thought Branson built the house here & then emigrated to the US - serves me right for "speed reading"!
However, it still begs the question - why "Warrenpoint"? ~x(

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#16 Post by patMG07 » Fri Aug 15, 2008 9:19 pm

The mystery deepens !

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#17 Post by StLouisGuy » Sat Aug 16, 2008 5:08 am

Good question, B&B. I was thinking the same thing. I do know that Branson was not Irish.

"William Branson was born June 29, 1684. He came from the parish of Sonning in Berkshire, England three miles from Reading. His father and grandfather, Nathaniel I and II were shoemakers and Quakers. His mother was Mary Bacon of Blewberry, Berkshire.

In 1683, Nathaniel Branson II purchased 1250 acres of land in the "new province" from William Penn for 25 pounds. The elder Branson never came to American but conveyed the property to William on August 28, 1707.

The next year, a young 24-year-old William Branson came to Philadelphia on the ship "Golden Lion" to seek his fortune.

The tract of land deeded him by his father made up the north central portion of what later became East and West Brandywine townships.

Branson was first listed as a "joiner" (carpenter). He must have followed this trade for at least ten years, for he is listed as a Freeman in the Minutes of the Common Council, having purchased his license to operate as an individual tradesman on May 20, 1717.

Later he was called a "shopkeeper" and by 1726, a "merchant." As "William Branson, Trader," he was part of a meeting in Philadelphia in 1729 called to fix the value of European currency used in the colony. In 1744, he was designated "William Branson, Gentleman."

Through the years, Branson purchased considerable property in Philadelphia and Chester County. His holdings in Coventry and Nantmeal townships had rich iron deposits.

He bought the site of Reading Furnace by deed dated Feb. 28, 1723 and was the partner of Samuel Nutt and Mordicai Lincoln--the great-grandfather of Abraham Lincoln. Branson bought out Lincoln in 1725 becoming the principal owner.

William Branson's Daughters

In 1709, Branson lived in Philadelphia on the east side of Second Street, which remained his home all the rest of his life. [See illustration.] He married Mary Tate of Philadelphia, daughter of Robert Tate, probably well before 1715. In 1723, William Branson shed his Quaker faith; his daughters were reared as Baptists.

Three sons died in infancy. Four daughters lived into adulthood:

Mary - who married Dr. Bernardhus Van Leer. Five sons were living when William Branson died in 1760: George, Branson, Benjamin, William, and Samuel.

Rebecca - married Samuel Flowers, who was a justice of the peace and sea captain. They had three children Mary wife of Gerardus Clarkson, Hannah wife of Thomas Assheton, and Samuel Branson, a physician.

Hannah - married Richard Hockley, agent for the Penns, Receiver General in 1753. They had 2 children: William and Mary who married John Wilcocks.

Elizabeth - married Lynford Lardner, brother-in-law of Richard Penn, son of William Penn, the founder of the Penn Colony; he was Receiver General from 1742-1752. Their children were John, Frances, Hannah, William, and James.

William Branson died in 1760, having survived all of his children except Elizabeth. His property was divided among the 15 grandchildren."

http://www.vanleerplus.org/branson.htm

More research needed here. Will see what I can come up with.

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#18 Post by the gap » Sat Aug 16, 2008 10:01 am

Was the name of our town at one time said to come from the family Warring and at one time spelt Warringspoint? The family Branson might have been in some way connected to Warringstown near Lurgan were the first Quaker Meeting house was built.I may be way out but worth the mention. As usual Slg great info from you :-):-) May be the spelling of the house name was changed over the years ~x(

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#19 Post by bornandbred » Sat Aug 16, 2008 4:14 pm

the gap wrote:Was the name of our town at one time said to come from the family Warring and at one time spelt Warringspoint? The family Branson might have been in some way connected to Warringstown near Lurgan were the first Quaker Meeting house was built.I may be way out but worth the mention. As usual Slg great info from you :-):-) May be the spelling of the house name was changed over the years ~x(
Well worth the mention, gap, & well thought out - I'm sure between yourself & SLG one of you will come up with an answer - did either of you ever work for the CIA or FBI? b-) ;) :D

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#20 Post by StLouisGuy » Sun Aug 17, 2008 4:09 am

bornandbred wrote:
the gap wrote:Was the name of our town at one time said to come from the family Warring and at one time spelt Warringspoint? The family Branson might have been in some way connected to Warringstown near Lurgan were the first Quaker Meeting house was built.I may be way out but worth the mention. As usual Slg great info from you :-):-) May be the spelling of the house name was changed over the years ~x(
Well worth the mention, gap, & well thought out - I'm sure between yourself & SLG one of you will come up with an answer - did either of you ever work for the CIA or FBI? b-) ;) :D
Well now, B&B, sure if I told you that then, well, you know................ :rotfl:

Gap, I have seen references to the town being named after the Warrens or Warings. In fact many of the older documents mention Warrenspoint (Griffith's Valuation for one). I have been nosing around looking for more info on Branson but so far no connections with our Point. As is often the case though, one gets easily distracted and learns so much other trivia. The search goes on.

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#21 Post by Mike » Sat Jan 23, 2010 6:35 pm

Much as I admire all the work of Ros Davies, with reference to the origins of the name St. Leonards, it is listed in the Griffith's Valuation as 'St Leonards-on-sea', the two houses as 'a' and 'b', but not yet occupied. This is some time earlier that the date mentioned previously. It may just be of coincidence that the owner of the property when the semi-detached pair of houses were built was - LEONARD Watson.

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#22 Post by silveryfox » Fri Aug 04, 2017 3:27 pm

Leonard Watson's wife was called Anne, and she died on 12 Jan 1864 at "Marine Parade, Warrenpoint" - which is where I
assume the two villas comprising St Leonard's on the Sea were and are located.

A month after his wife's death Leonard Watson advertised the properties for sale or let in local and national papers - the
9 May 1864 Dublin Evening post contained the following:

"To be let or sold (either together or separately), two semi-detached, recently built villas, known as "St. Leonard's on
the Sea", within five minutes walk of the Town of Warrenpoint and the Railway Station to Newry. They command the
most picturesque view of the Mountains of Rostrevor and the beautiful Bay and the Mountains of Carlingford.

The accommodation in each is very similar, comprising spacious hall, 3 reception rooms, 6 bedchambers, servants'
apartments, watercloset, bathroom, kitchen (with all the recent improvements), pantries, larders, wine-cellars, 3-horse
stable, hayloft, and double coachhouse, enclosed yard, punp, dairy, and other out-offices, with an abundant supply of pure water.

Also excellent gardens in the rear, and spacious lawn in front, with a separate entrance to each vila.

The whole stands on 2 statute acres of ground, held by lease under Roger Hall, Esq., for the term of 150 years, at the
small annual rent of £13 18s.

For further particulars apply to the owner, Leonard Watson, Esq., Warrenpoint.
"

Leonard Watson was born abt 1786, and was recorded as Harbour Master of Warrenpoint in 1830. He was the local Agent for several
marine insurance companies, including Liverpool Underwriters and Lloyds of London. In 1860 he was
Vice-Commodore of the Carlingford Lough Regatta, and several years later as a Master Mariner, Agent for Lloyds
and Conservator for Carlingford.

He died on 9 Oct 1867 at St. Leonards on the Sea, and is buried at St. Patrick's COI in Newry with other Watson relatives.

The Administrator of his estate was Lancelot G Watson of Dublin, who advertised the villas for sale.

Leonard had four daughters, Anne Eliza, Jane, Bethea and Georgiana, all of whom married and moved away.

It is likely that Leonard Watson built the villas.

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#23 Post by xpaddy » Fri Aug 04, 2017 7:28 pm

Interesting reading.

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Re: Why St Leonard's?

#24 Post by Brian » Sat Aug 05, 2017 9:55 am

Marine Parade is near the docks (just around the corner from dock street) It's where the Marine Tavern and Lough and Quay are now. I note in the article above that Mr Watson was the harbour master - as an aside the harbour masters house was at Marine Parade. (roughly opposite the Lough and Quay)

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