oldwarrenpointforum

Sometimes I pretend to be normal, but it gets boring so I go back to being myself
It is currently Sat Dec 16, 2017 10:46 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:32 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 9:57 pm
Posts: 1848
Location: Warrenpoint
Speaking of Charlotte St................
Billy McKinley wrote this article for the Warrenpoint Historical Group Magazine published in the Spring 1992, and he takes us back to his formative days in Charlotte Street.

CHARLOTTE ST. IN THE 1930’S AND EARLY 1940’S

By Billy McKinley

Charlotte Street in the 1990’s is little different from its appearance in the 1930’s. The gas lights are long gone but I can still recall the evenings when Johnny Ward would go round the streets lighting the lamps, and my brother Derek and I would meet him at the top of the street, as he would let us go up the ladder to light the mantles, but he would never allow us to climb the big lamp in the Square, (I wonder why?). When he gave up the job Jamesy Fitzpatrick took over, but by then we were getting sensible!
Charlotte Street wasn’t always called by that name. It was in the mid-1930’s that the council changed its name from Meeting Street from Newry Street corner and Charlotte Street up to the Square. In fact some of our friends in Canada still send us mail addressed Meeting Street.
There was very little in Meeting Street except Byrne’s Garage and the two lanes, the “Wee Lane,” and the “Big Lane.” Each lane had six houses and they were always occupied. Sadly these houses have long since gone, and families scattered all over the town. Tom McGuigan’s filling station now stands were the “Wee Lane” was. In those days there were no bathrooms or central heating and a cold tap in the yard was a big improvement to carrying water from the pump at Kelly’s yard or down from the well up the Well Loaning.
There used to be great fun on our street with very few cars and only horses and carts. The road was not surfaced as we know it today, with only the centre tarred. In fact it was about 1936-37 that John Gregg & Sons Ltd. from Larne asphalted the main streets of the town including Charlotte Street.
The north side of the street was in even numbers and the south side in odd numbers, and as it would be confusing to describe them in order I will describe the south side first, beginning at number one.

Southside

No. 1 Fitzpatrick’s Corner Shop and Tearooms upstairs, was occupied by Mrs. Fitzpatrick. She was a widow, and was originally called O’Neill, then Kearney. She had a daughter, Teresa, who later married Gerry Hughes (Stormy Weather). He got his nick-name by always whistling the song, “Stormy Weather.”
No. 3 James “Shot” Keown was caretaker of The I.N.F. Hall next door, and when the Forrester’s moved around the shore, “Shot” McKeown as he was called went to live in Duke Street. Mr. and Mrs. John McKevitt and family (John, Dan and Ita) then moved in.
The hall next door was then used as a variety hall, one artist was called “Wee Teddy.”
No. 5 Thomas Heatley and his wife Alice and family. (Gerry, Maura, Tom and Malachy.)
No. 7 Maggie and Stephen Magill were followed by Jim Magee and wife Bridget and family.
Next door was a yard with an old house which I am told was the church in Warrenpoint before St. Peter’s was built, but of course that was long before my time! The yard stretched to Newry Streets’ Plough Bar owned by Davy McKnight, and was called Davy McKnight’s Yard. There were two iron gates. I remember great excitement one day, when I was very small; a large whale had got stranded and died on the beach. For some reason it was taken to McKnight’s Yard, where hundreds of sightseers clamoured for a glimpse of this huge animal. On this site was constructed Smyth’s Bottling works which stayed there all through the 1940’s and 1950’s before moving to The Newry Road.
No. 9 Mr. and Mrs. Small and family.
No.11 Mr. and Mrs. Willie Ward and family lived here, but before them was the Lyons family who immigrated to America.
No.13 Mrs. Carr and family who went to live in Dublin. After them came Peter and Rose McGivern. She called the house “Ardmallon.”
No. 15 Jimmy Dinsmore and his wife and family moved in after the Gordon’s left. By a co- incidence the house is once more owned by the Gordon family. (Not the same connection.)
No 17 I remember Sam McCullough lived here, but I often heard that a family named Harcourt were here before that. One son later became High Sherriff of Belfast, and later Lord Mayor.
No. 19 Mrs. Rice and her family, Joe, Peter and Kitty.
Nos. 21/23 Alfred McClelland’s Garage and Coach Builders were famous, and lords and ladies were his best customers. His slogan, “Shell motor spirit makes your car fairly fly.” He was a gifted organist and played in the Presbyterian Church.
No. 25 Mrs. Annie McCourt and daughter Susan, (later Mrs. Arthur McLoughlin), lived here.
No. 27 Mr. Edward Caulfield and family. Mr. Caulfield was a councillor for many years and had many terms as chairman of the Urban Council. He was a Member of the Newry Guardians, and could issue lines for free dispensary treatment from The Dispensary across the street.
There was a plot of ground with a bookie’s office and a blacksmith’s forge. This was called Kelly’s Yard, and the old pump stood on pavement here. The late Billy Burns, (father of Sean and Billy) brother of “Laddie Da” Burns operated the bookies shop for some time, and the forge was owned by Mr. McCormack, father of Terry, who also worked there for a time. In the war years, the mortuary garage was built here and the fire station was housed here until the early 1950’s.
No. 29 Mr. and Mrs. George Dinsmore and family lived here for years.
No. 31 Johnny and Mary Ellen Dinsmore. Johnny was an old seadog and used to own a rowing boat, which he used for the Omeath trip.
No. 33 A Mr. and Mrs. Crozier and before them, Wards had there home here, followed by Mr. and Mrs. Burns.
No. 35 The Heaney family who moved out. Mr. and Mrs. James Caulfield (school attendance officer) and daughter Margaret came to live here.
No. 37 Mr. and Mrs. Paddy McGuigan and family, (the late Christy was born here), occupied this house before my own family moved in. In fact we were all born there. My sister Mary still lives in the house.
No. 39 Mr. and Mrs. Jack Boyle and family, and Jack’s brother Jimmy lived here. Jimmy Boyle was the only survivor of the Connemara/ Retriever disaster, and was washed ashore at Cranfield although he could not swim a stroke.
After Boyles left the Keohane family moved in. The late Mr. Keohane was an Air Raid Patrol officer during the war, and originally came from Cork.
No. 41 Mr. and Mrs. Willie Gallagher, a seafaring family, followed by Mr. Eugene Gallagher.
No. 43 Arthur and Alicia Gallagher and family. Arthur was a postman and Alicia was always available to help in the houses of the street were anyone was sick or in any trouble.
No. 45 Mrs. Clarke’s house until Joe and Sally Smith moved in. Joe who only died a few years ago, was also a postman.
No. 47 The McDonalds. Mr. McDonald was a golf pro in Warrenpoint Golf Club, and after they left Tommy (Stoker) Reay and his wife Cissy came to live here.
No. 49 Hughie McGuiness and his family lived here for many years.
No. 51 The Hughes family, followed by the McAteer family, and eventually Mr. Frank O’Hare and family, (Jean O’Hare still lives here.)
No. 53 Peter and Rosie McGuiness and family complete the south side. Back up the street.

The Northside

No. 2 The Fitzimmons family, where James Murphy, a chemist, succeeded McViegh’s. He (Mr. Murphy) also moved into the residence and when he left the Fitzimmons family continued business as chemists (John Fitzimmons). At the turn of the century the post Office and Savings Bank was here.
Nos. 4/6 Burns the Barbers and Hairdressers were in business as long as I can remember. Billy and Charlie were the barbers, and Mrs. Burns ran the hairdressers. They were open until 10.00 pm on Saturdays.
No. 8 Brady’s fruit shop preceded McElroy’s Butchers. Brady’s moved next door to……………..
No. 10 after Kerr’s, Barbers, retired from business, and Tony Brady stayed for many years before moving to Newry.
No. 12 Dan and Mary Ward lived here, and after they died, the late Charlie McGreevy bought it and had a footwear shop and did shoe repairs.
No. 14 Was formerly Crawford’s Ship’s Chandlers. Then Davy Sinclair repaired shoes and boots. Charlie McGreevy was here until he moved to No. 12.
No. 14a The Crawford family. Mr. Sean Crawford who taught in various schools was also a prolific writer and many of his stories were published in “Our Boys,” “The Irish Press,” and of course local papers. A plaque to his memory was unveiled here last year on August 14th.
No. 16 McCarthy’s Fish & Fruit shop is still there. Only Mary is there now, I hope she will be with us for a long time yet.
No. 18 Was the old R.I.C. when the new barracks was built the McFadden family moved in and called it “Flurry Bridge House.” The Tohill family were nearly all reared there.
No. 20 Maeve Crawford (a blind lady) whose familiar figure with the white stick I can still remember. It was also the home of Michael George Crawford who brought fame to the town with his ‘Crawford’s Legendary Stories.’ Sadly he lost his life in a train accident years ago.
No. 22 Davy McGuffin and family were followed by Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rooney and family, Annie, Joe and Noel. Mrs. Rooney operated a very popular guesthouse for English and Scottish visitors. The McGuffins had a big field (where the playground is today), circuses used to come to this field. The late Mrs. Hall presented this field to the council and it was stipulated that it was to be used for children.
No. 24 Johnny and Kate Hanna, with their son Hughie, lived here. Hughie later went to America where he prospered. The R.U.C. Station occupied part of what was known as ‘The Long Yard.’ As the name implies it was used to store the long cars which operated to Newcastle etc. Johnny McGivern had a paint shop there, before The Heatley Brothers set up in business.
No. 26 Miss McElroy’s was one of the two buildings called “Blythe Terrace” after the late William B. Blythe, a famous band conductor and composer of flute band marches. One march I recall was “Moygannon.” Mr. William B. Blythe was a cousin of Burns the Barbers.
No. 28 The Magee family lived here in No. 28 followed by Henry Cole and family. Later still the Mackin family came. The ground floor was The Dispensary run by Doctor J.A.O’Tierney. You could get a free line for treatment in Caulfield’s at No. 27. These houses were later ‘listed buildings’ but the big bomb (14th April 1989) ended that and now they are no more.
No. 30 is also gone but the Heaney family were here before mar. and Mrs. Barney Gallagher.
No. 32 the Cassidy family went to live in Dublin and after them came Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Kerr, who owned a garage in Newry. Mr. Arthur and Susan McLoughlin then moved in with their family.
No. 34 The Peers family and after them came the Cole family, who moved down from
No. 36 Paddy and Rose Dinsmore and family. This house is still owned by Dinsmores, Oliver and May and family live here
No. 38 The Bradley family. Their uncle Mick Boyle who was The Town inspector lived with them.
No. 40 Mrs. Curran who was followed by Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bleakley and family. A railway man, Jack unfortunately lost his life in a shunting accident at Banbridge. The Well Loaning which gave access to McGuffin’s Field and The Spring Well separated numbers 40 & 42. Numbers 42, 44 and 46 were known as Athelby Terrace.
No. 42 Paddy and Lena Bradley and family owned a Grocer and Confectionary business here and you could buy anything in their shop.( They later moved around to The Leinster View Guesthouse, at Seaview.)
No. 44 The O’Hare family were followed by the McAllister family. Mr. McAllister was a retired U.S. Navy man.
No. 46 Mrs. Brady’s guesthouse was popular with summer visitors. After them came the O’Loughlin family.
No. 48 the McCamley family (John was a postman) lived here.
No. 50 Mr. Morgan (a railway man) and his wife left and then came Mr. and Mrs. Percy Davis and family.
No. 52 Mrs. Gray and family, they also kept visitors. Then came a Navy man Bill Howlett and family, followed by their cousins Mr. and Mrs. Paddy McAteer.
No. 54 The two Miss Farrells, who were always dressed in black right down to their ankles, as all older women did at the time. Later came Mr. and Mrs Daniel Corrigan and family (Raymond and Joe.) Later still came Mr. and Mrs. Barney O’Hare who went to America.
No. 56 Mr. James Crosswell and family, (James was breadman). He joined the Air Raid Patrol during the Second World War, and kept a sharp lookout for people violating the blackout. Jimmy (Poker) Byrne and his wife Agnes followed them.
No. 58 Harry (Bulker), Nellie and Francie (Pigeon) Smyth. Harry was a champion side drummer, and he taught me the side drum in the forester’s band.
No. 60 Mrs. (Grannie) Watters and Nannie always wore long clothes. Mrs. Watter’s daughter Mrs. Sarah Heaton, and her family later moved in.
No. 62 The Mackrell family were here for many years, and then Mrs. Bridget Moore (nee Mackrell) and family.
No. 64 James and Minnie McGivern, their grandchildren Gerry and Mavis Jones lived with them.
No. 66 The Reays lived here, and Mrs. Charles Orr (Jennie Reay), and family stayed on and retained the tenancy.
No. 68 Annie and Lizzie Hanna had the last house in the street. Annie owned the field where The Fire Station was built, and woe betide anyone who played in the field.
During WW 2 a large air raid shelter was built on that side of Meeting Street but was never used.

Of course I cannot forget The Meeting House or Presbyterian Church. The Memorial hall at the back was a billet for the army, The Cheshire and Northumberland Regiments, before the Yanks arrived but I suppose that is another story.

Billy McKinley
January 1992


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 7:06 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:53 am
Posts: 4673
Location: Warrenpoint
Thanks for resurrecting these articles Duke St.I didn't know that Daddy was born in no37 Charlotte St.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 7:44 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:01 pm
Posts: 3217
Location: Ostrohe GERMANY
The William Gallagher at no 41 was my Great granda who was a stoker on ships.The 1911 census states my great Uncle William was born in Liverpool.(died 1915 S S Upas) I was told years ago that my granda Artchie was born in Barrow in Furness but i have never had that confirmed as he is not on the 1911 census.I have been told he was at one time working Liverpool before he got married.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 8:00 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 8:24 pm
Posts: 7522
Location: Warrenpoint
Excellent Dukestreet and thanks to Billy for giving such a detailed description of my old street,very much the street that I grew up in..............


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 8:33 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 9:57 pm
Posts: 1848
Location: Warrenpoint
Northbrook, who was Annie in the Rooney family, that lived just below your house at Number 22? I remember Mrs. Rooney, a lovely woman. I don't remember the father Joe, do you? Was he ever in America, that you were aware off? I heard a great yarn about a Joe Rooney, I wonder was it the same Joe Rooney?
Vincie Morgan from Rostrevor, but nowadays domiciled up in Oakland Crescent, said that in the late 1940's, on the 15th of August when he was only a young boy, his mother would bring them to the 'Point for a treat. Their first port of call was Mrs. Rooney's house.He and his brothers and sisters would be ecstatic about a visit to the 'Point back then.

Yes it is a excellent article from Billy, I would love to see him write one from the war years.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2009 8:50 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 8:24 pm
Posts: 7522
Location: Warrenpoint
Dukestreet........as far as I can remember Mr.& Mrs.Rooney were called Willie and Rose, but of course we knew them only as Mr.& Mrs.Rooney, I do believe they also had a daughter older than the two boys, that must have been the Annie that Billy speaks of, I have no memory of her at all, so I presume she died when she was quite young...........................


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 12:56 am 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2008 10:32 pm
Posts: 1364
Location: Warrenpoint
Another very informative recollection. :-):-)


The "Wee lane" and the " Big lane " off Meeting Street have been mentioned elsewhere several times and I had already gathered that they were where the filling station was built ( c.1979/1980 ?) and also in the space between the backs of Charlotte Street and Newry Street. I am guessing then that the Big Lane was parallel with the two streets and was between them but given the Wee Lane was where the filling station was built I wonder was it also parallel with Newry and Charlotte Street or was it at right angles and thus parallel to Meeting Street? I had often wondered previously why the houses down as far as 43 had gardens and those from 45 to the corner had just yards and therefore what had been in the empty space behind the yards.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:59 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:13 pm
Posts: 3570
Location: Warrenpoint
Brilliant, dukestreet! So many familiar names from my past - Mrs Fitzpatrick was always known as "Kearney O'Neill Fitzpatrick", but I see from the article that is not the correct order!

We have often wondered about the Mrs Carr who lived in no.13 - she may have been the Kathleen Carr who appears in the photo of the Warrenpoint Players. I wonder if Billy would know which Carr family she came from?

It was also interesting to read that Mr Crosswell, who preceded Poker Byrne just a few doors up from us, was a breadman! He must have been a gifted amateur photographer in his spare time, as all my baby & child photos were taken in his "studio"!

I could go on & on about this..so many names conjure great memories!

A lot of the former residents were unknown to me of course, & it's very interesting to see who was there before our time. It also confirms the locations of "Athelby" & "Blythe" terraces. Thanks to Billy for writing it all, & to you for sharing it with us.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 2:11 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 8:24 pm
Posts: 7522
Location: Warrenpoint
It was also interesting to read that Mr Crosswell, who preceded Poker Byrne just a few doors up from us, was a breadman! He must have been a gifted amateur photographer in his spare time, as all my baby & child photos were taken in his "studio"!

I think you might mean Mr.Hopper B&B..................he was married to Nancy Crosswell and was a professional photographer, he had a studio above McClorey and Sherry`s and may have done some work also from the house in Charlotte St. ...............I have faint memories of Mr.Crosswell, I`ve a notion he delivered bread for McCombs ...........I, like yourself found this a fascinating topic, but then we both have a vested interest in our old street ....................well done Billy ......................................................


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 2:23 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 4:17 am
Posts: 2637
Location: Florida, USA
No. 27 Mr. Edward Caulfield and family. Mr. Caulfield was a councillor for many years and had many terms as chairman of the Urban Council. He was a Member of the Newry Guardians, and could issue lines for free dispensary treatment from The Dispensary across the street.


Edward Caulfield was my great grandfather - I was aware of his position in regards to the Urban council etc... but I've never heard of this practice of " issued lines for free dispensary" ;--) , does this infer that people would go to someone on the Urban Council to get permission to see the doctor ? ...... I know the caulfields had a good eye for horses - but I guess this is the closest we'll get to having a doctor in the family :D


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 7:38 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2008 10:32 pm
Posts: 1364
Location: Warrenpoint
I would presume that Guardians pre-dated the Welfare state and the position would have originally been created as a result of the poor laws. I didn't know though that they were able to issue free prescriptions !


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 11:38 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 07, 2007 12:07 pm
Posts: 3417
Location: Hilltown
I didnt see this article first time round in the Historical Magazine.............so thanks dukestreet for posting.
Its a fascinating record of Charlotte/meeting Street.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 9:40 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 9:57 pm
Posts: 1848
Location: Warrenpoint
With reference to Number 3 Charlotte Street, the dwelling of Mr. James 'Shot' McKeown, ex-caretaker of the INF Hall, when it was situated in Charlotte Street.
When ever I watch that great film, 'Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid,' I immediately think of James 'Shot' McGeown. I never met the late Mr.McGeown, I sure he has passed away a long time ago.

But probably in the 1970's this great Western got a showing on television, and my father really enjoyed it, a few days afterwards, Harry Smyth and Dan McKevitt called at our house for a visit, they started talking about Warrenpoint of their youth, but all of a sudden my father went of at tangent and started to describe a character from the film.
It was the part when the two outlaws had just robbed train or a bank, and the posse where chasing them.They did everything conceivable to give the Sheriff's posse the slip, but they could not shake them off. The reason being, that among the sheriff's posse was an expert Indian tracker with the unlikely name of Lord Baltimore, this man was a relentless, dogged pursuer, he would not be put off their track,no matter what ruse they tried to throw him off the scent, over land or water,he was better than any bloodhound. (He must had a built in Satelite Navigation System.)
When he had finished describing this man, my father said that this Lord Baltimore in the movie was almost as good as Shot McKeown for chasing and tracking.
The moral of the story was that when you rapped Shot McKeown 's door on Charlotte Street's Southside, be prepared for a long night's running around the town, think long and hard about the indescretion one was about to commit, and woe betide one if Mr. McKeown caught up with you.
I wonder had Mr. McGeown's nickname anything to do with the fact, that when his door was rapped, he would be out like a 'shot' after the culprits? Could Forthroad ask his father if he has any ideas about the origins of the nickname?
I don't want to cast aspersions but it wouldn't surprise me, if Dodds was among the door knockers of those times.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2009 11:03 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:01 pm
Posts: 3217
Location: Ostrohe GERMANY
I think you are right, Dodds was one of them door knockers, but i bet you he was the only one who got away on SKATES :rotfl:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 1:46 am 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 14, 2008 1:48 pm
Posts: 5150
Dukestreet - wouldn't want to ring his door bell.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:13 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2008 3:39 pm
Posts: 1625
Location: Warrenpoint
dukestreet wrote:
wonder had Mr. McGeown's nickname anything to do with the fact, that when his door was rapped, he would be out like a 'shot' after the culprits? Could Forthroad ask his father if he has any ideas about the origins of the nickname?


I was just talking to uncle Billy there and he said apparently James "shot" Mc Keown lived in America for quite a few years and whilst residing over there got into an incident whereupon he had the misfortune to be SHOT in the arse!( excuse Billys french!), he can`t be sure in what exact circumstances this took place, but Mr Mc Keown had the bigger misfortune to mention it to someone when he returned back over here, giving rise to his new name!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:38 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 4:17 am
Posts: 2637
Location: Florida, USA
VERY FUNNY HCTC :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

Not unlike a nickname that was applied to someone who couldn't make their mind up about going to Australia and ( for a short time) was referred to as "boomerang " ( actual name withheld to protect the innocent :-S )


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:40 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2008 3:39 pm
Posts: 1625
Location: Warrenpoint
MARK my words..someone will mention his name Whitestar!! :D :rotfl:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:41 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 8:24 pm
Posts: 7522
Location: Warrenpoint
I know a few Boomerangs about the Point .....................................I heard of one who got as far as the airport and returned, but I think that was only a yarn ......................................................


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 5:44 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 4:17 am
Posts: 2637
Location: Florida, USA
herecomestheCONGO wrote:
MARK my words..someone will mention his name Whitestar!! :D :rotfl:



Great Minds think alike HCTC :genius:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2009 8:47 pm 
Offline
Member
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:13 pm
Posts: 3570
Location: Warrenpoint
[quote="northbrook"] I think you might mean Mr.Hopper B&B..................he was married to Nancy Crosswell and was a professional photographer, he had a studio above McClorey and Sherry`s and may have done some work also from the house in Charlotte St. quote]

Correct, northbrook - I always get mixed up with the Hoppers & Crosswells...even though I've had this discussion before on the forum! :-c


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group